Best Tips to Pinpoint LH Surge with Most Accuracy  

Thank you for choosing easy @ home ovulation tests. Thousands of our customers have followed the tips below and got pregnant. And we would like to share them with you.

There are two simple but important facts about LH tests and LH Surge: 1. LH urine Test measures the LH Level in urine and; 2. LH Surge pattern varies from person to person. 

First thing first. Know what different LH Surge patterns look like and identify your own.

Pattern 1:  Gradual LH onset of greater than 1-day duration (2-6 days). i.e. See Example below. The user did her 1st test on CD7 and saw a very light test line (Negative).  She kept testing and found the line became darker on CD14, then it got darker gradually to the darkest on CD17- her peak day.  She is a typical Gradual Onset Type

01 LH Level Parttern_Gradual Onset.jpg

Pattern 2: Rapid LH Onset of 1-day duration (< 1 day). See Example below. The user got an idea of what a baseline on CD6, she kept testing once a day. On CD 12 she got a darker line and it got darker rapidly. Then she tested twice and on CD13 she caught a darkest test line. She almost missed it if she didn’t test twice on CD13.  Her type is rapid onset. 

02 LH Level Parttern_Rapid Onset.jpg

No matter what pattern you have, you are not alone. 57.1% studied women are gradual onset type and 42.9% are rapid onset type as below shown. 

LH Chart.jpg

     Why it is important to understand the pattern and know your own pattern?

Some women with rapid onset may have very short onset for just a few hours and they may easily miss LH Surge.  Other women who have seen over 2 days positive result may doubt the result because they think surge is too long to be true.  So, if you are knowledgeable about the patterns and know your own pattern, you won’t miss it or misinterpreting it.

I know pattern matters, but how could I find my pattern easily

Premom Ovulation Predictor is the first and only fertility app to help for that. You can just easily upload the test photos to Premom and they will align up automatically for you to visualize your pattern free of hassle. See Premom’s pictures below.                

 

                                   < 1 day Onset Example                                                        2-day Onset Example                     

  Now being more knowledgeable, you can easily follow the steps below.  

  1. Do LH testing soon after your period ends (recommended in the afternoon) to find the lightest test line as a baseline (Your first Period day is CD1). Keep Testing until you find test line gets darker. That’s your onset starting day. Test twice a day since then.
  2. If test line gets darker rapidly and drops very soon to baseline within one day. You have rapid onset. In the next cycle you can do less testing in the beginning but test twice when test line gets darker than baseline.
  3. If your test line keeps same dark or darker than control line over 2 days, you have gradual onset. You may just test once a day to save your testing when test line gets darker if your pattern doesn’t change.                                                                                                                                                                                       

More other types: Some women with PCOS or having lower LH surge level (lower than 25 mIU/mL) may not find test line same or darker than control line at surge. See the example below. In these cases, just identify the darkest line as peak time with consistently testing.

ovulation tests gallery-03.jpg

There are a few users who may find their LH Test lines light-dark-light-dark-light in one cycle like the picture below. It is known as “biphasic” pattern.  The darkest line on CD20 is the surge.

03 LH Level Parttern_biphasic.jpg

If after trying all above tips and not find your LH Surge, please contact us by Toll-free number 1-855-822-6999 9:00 am to 5:00 pm central time or email to support@premom.com for our Fertility Specialist to help you. We are committed to helping you achieve your fertility goal.  

Amanda St. Aubin